by Wednesday, August 16, 2017
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Shaped like a dome, the Temazcal tent symbolises going back inside the mothers womb and reconnecting with ourselves in the most innate way

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Temazcal is a sweat-lodge ceremony that has been practiced by Native Indians for over thousands of years.

Shaped like a dome, the Temazcal tent symbolises going back inside the mothers womb and reconnecting with ourselves in the most innate way.

As well as cleansing the body through the exposure of the hot steam, Temazcal, has the power to bring us back to our centre; calm, collected and in tune with the present moment.

This can be explained by the heat experienced during the Temazcal, which can be very challenging.

With little to no space to move & with others sitting in and around you, the steam that is released of hot stones (revered as grandmothers) can be hard to endure.

There is an urge to want to leave as the mind thinks its in trouble and fear mounts.

By surrendering to the heat that Temazcal brings, and singing sacred songs with others inside the dome shaped hut, thoughts of wanting to leave wane, overcome by the power of the shared heart.

During this process, there is an understanding and discovery of ones own inner-strength and power as a human being.

Also called ‘medicine of the relations’ Native Indians do Temazcal as a way to connect with themselves and all relations on this planet on a more deeper, heart-centered level.

The ceremony was conducted by medicine woman Fernanda Lourenço and her husband Bhagat Param Singh.

Fernanda Lourenço

 

Bhagat Param Singh

Fernanda Lourenço lived and worked with the Guaranis indigenous people in Brazil for 9 months and is a counsellor of the sacred fire of Itzachilatlan – Segualquia. She made some rituals within the red path, which is also called sun dance/vision quest.

She is the eternal sun dancer.

Fernanda quotes:

”My purpose to follow the red path is to follow what my heart
feels. Allow my being to be in harmony with all the movements
of life. Honouring all ancestry and all sacred altars.
To be a guardian of the knowledge and wisdom, so I can
pass it to future generations to show how to respect and care for the elements of nature”.

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